Arizona Archaeological Society

 

 
 

2019-2020Meeting Schedule 

The chapter meets at Pueblo Grande Museum at 7:00 pm on the second Tuesday of each month (except during June, July & August). Driving directions to PGM: Due to the construction of the light-rail system, west-bound cars can no longer turn left from Washington Street into the museum; instead traffic approaching from the east must make a U-turn at the light at 44th street. From the West Valley, use 44th Street or east-bound Washington Street.

Date

Speaker

Topic

Sept. 10

Chris Loendorf, GRIC

The Hohokam to Akimel O’Odham Continuum: The Transition from Prehistory to History in the Phoenix Basin of Southern Arizona

Oct. 08

Paul & Suzy Fish, ASM, Tucson

Two Early Villages of Tumamoc Hill

Nov. 12

John Langan, Aztec Eng., Phoenix

Recent Excavations in the Eastern Papaguería

Dec. 10

Todd Bostwick, VVAC

Ankgor and the Khmer Empire of Cambodia


To join the Phoenix Chapter, Click on the link below:  

Phoenix Chapter Membership Form

To download the May flyer, click on the link below:

May Flyer

Phoenix May Chapter News

May 14th Meeting: How a River, a Terrace, and a Butte Influenced the Spatial Development of a Hohokam Village by Erik Steinbach, Sr. Assoc. Archaeologist, Logan Simpson, Tempe. The Hohokam site of La Plaza is an extensive multi-component site that lies at the base of Tempe Butte and continues east along the edge of the Lehi terrace of the Salt River underneath the City of Tempe and the ASU Tempe campus. Early settlement of Tempe covered major portions of the site before its spatial extent could be documented. Due to the limited size and fragmentation of the projects that have been done, it has been difficult to put together a large-scale study of the entire village. Erik will review published data from over three dozen CRM projects undertaken in the last 40 years to trace the development of La Plaza through time and tie its spatial layout to the geographic benefits and restraints of the the Salt River, the Mesa Terrace, and Tempe Butte.

Erik Steinbach is a Sr. Associate Archaeologist with Logan Simpson, Tempe. He has been involved in archaeology for over 20 years, and has been employed in Arizona, mostly in the Phoenix area, for the past 15 years. He began his career as a volunteer at the Iron Age site of Tel Rehov in the Jordan Valley in Israel, and returned for 9 field seasons as a field supervisor and cartographer. In 2000 he received a scholarship to study at the W. F. Albright Institute for Archaeological Research in Jerusalem. He graduated with a BA in Anthropology from ASU in 2003. He has directed field crews on archaeological surveys and excavations throughout Arizona and has authored or coauthored over 100 technical reports.

April 9th Meeting: Andrea Gregory, Director of Cultural Resources for Archaeological Consulting Services, talked about Subsistence, Ceramic Production, and Exchange at Farmstead Sites on the Queen Creek Bajada. Evidence recovered from two farmstead sites during a recent project showed that outlying areas along the Queen Creek delta and bajada were occupied from the Pioneer well into the Classic Period, with peak use during the Sedentary Period. Although small, these sites maintained contact with middle Gila River communities throughout the Sedentary and show increased local ceramic production from the Sedentary through the early Classic, a trend that has been identified at other Hohokam sites during that era. 

April 7th Tour of the Museum of the West: DFC members Jim and Jan Patton led us on a tour of selected exhibits including a wonderful exhibit of 65 pieces of Hopi yellow ware that includes works that are 500 years old, and 18 original Nampeyo works.

Upcoming Events:

May 7, 5:30 pm, Archaeology Cafe, Talk: The Greater Gila River: Public Lands, Tribal Lands, and Our Connections to These Places by William H. Doelle. At Changing Hands Bookstore, 300 W Camelback Rd, Phx.

Upcoming Conferences:

June 12, 8 am-5 pm, Archaeology Workshop at the 2019 Arizona Historic Preservation Conference, Prescott. For more information or to register, go to https://azpreservation.com/

The Phoenix Chapter meets at 7 pm on the 2nd Tuesday of each month in the Community Room at the Pueblo Grande Museum, 4619 E. Washington St., Phoenix. We take the speaker to dinner at 5:30 pm at the Ruby Tuesday Restaurant on 44th Street and Washington just northwest of the museum. If you are interested in having dinner with the speaker, please call or email Marie (480-827-8070 or mbrit@cox.net) so that she can reserve a large enough table.

--Ellie Large

**For chapter news from earlier this year, go to the bottom of this page.

Phoenix Chapter Officers

Office Office Holder Telephone Email Address
President Ellie Large 480-461-0563 elarge@cox.net
Exec VP/Field Trips Eric Feldman 480-296-5217 feldbrain@hotmail.com  
Archivist/Cert Rep Marie Britton 480-827-8070 mbrit@cox.net
Treasurer Vacant
             


Secretary/Education Ellen Martin 480-820-1474 e13martin@hotmail.com
2-Year Director Phyllis Smith 623-694-8245 76desert@gmail.com 
3-Year Director Nancy Unferth 602-371-1165 nferth@aol.com
1-Year Director Vicki Caltabiano 480-730-3289 vickierhart@cox.net 
Advisor Laurene Montero 602-495-0901 laurene.montero@phoenix.gov 

                                                                                    


Chapter Projects

PGM STABILIZATION PROJECT- PHOENIX CHAPTER

Pueblo Grande is a Classic Period Hohokam site located in downtown Phoenix at Pueblo Grande Museum and Archaeological Park. This archaeological site has been designated a National Historic Landmark. For the past thirteen years the Arizona Archaeology Society, Phoenix Chapter volunteers along with the Southwest Archaeology Team have participated in doing stabilization, reconstruction, and general maintenance on the platform mound and adjacent room structures.

After the Hohokam abandoned this site, it fell into a state of self-stabilization where walls become protected by the material that eroded from above. Early excavations, especially in the 1930's, exposed many of these walls again. These adobe walls have been subjected to constant erosion from wind and rain as well as other agents of deterioration. Consequently, new adobe mud must be applied periodically to keep these structures from melting away. Stone faced walls require repointing to keep the stones from falling from the wall. Exposed room walls are protected by applying a thin layer of mud to the wall surface. Monitoring these architectural features for erosion damage is an on-going task.

A dedicated group of volunteers, known as the PGM Mudslingers meet one Saturday a month except in July and August. The Mudslingers work is coordinated by Jim Britton (member of AAS and SWAT) under the direction of Dr.Todd Bostwick (Phoenix City Archaeologist). All work is documented by detailed field notes and photos.

This partnership between the Mudslingers and the City Archaeologist is a great benefit to Pueblo Grande Museum and is very much appreciated by the Museum Director and the Parks and Recreation Department staff.

by Jim Britton

Project Activity Project Director
Mudslingers at Pueblo Grande 3rd Saturday of each month Contact Jim Britton to verify the time and day
    







Local Museums

Museum Location Website
Pueblo Grande Museum and Archaeological Park 4619 E. Washington Street, Phoenix AZ 85034
(602) 495-0901
Pueblo Grande Museum

Huhugam Heritage Center

 21359 S Maricopa Rd, Chandler, AZ 85226 grichhc.org
Huhugam Ki Museum
10005 E. Osborn Road, Scottsdale, Arizona 85256
(480) 850-8190
Huhugam Ki Museum
Arizona Museum of Natural History 53 N. Macdonald St.
Mesa, AZ 85201
(480) 664-2230
Arizona Museum of Natural History
Cave Creek Museum 6140 East Skyline Drive
Cave Creek, AZ 85331
(480) 488-2764
Cave Creek Museum






















Phoenix April Chapter News

April 9th Meeting: Andrea Gregory, Director of Cultural Resources for Archaeological Consulting Services, will talk about Subsistence, Ceramic Production, and Exchange at Farmstead Sites on the Queen Creek Bajada. Evidence recovered from two farmstead sites during a recent project shows that outlying areas along the Queen Creek delta and bajada were occupied from the Pioneer well into the Classic Period, with peak use during the Sedentary Period. Although small, these sites maintained contact with middle Gila River communities throughout the Sedentary and also show increased local ceramic production from the Sedentary through the early Classic, a trend that has been identified at other Hohokam sites during that era. 

March 9th Ancient Technology Day: Marie & Jim Britton along with Sylvia Lesko (out for a visit from San Francisco) showed more than 100 children how to make miniature adobe bricks. PGM had all the equipment we needed, as well as table, chairs and a shade canopy. They graciously supplied a large tarp, brick forms, foil-covered cardboard disks, trowels, a mixing bin, shovel, hoe and a broom for clean-up, as well as 6 large buckets full of dirt and all the water we needed to make the mud for the bricks. We set up a hand-washing station with towels they provided. We demonstrated how to fill the form with mud, smooth it out and then punch the brick out of the form.  PGM staff mentioned they had a good day and attendance was over 400 people. Marie says  that 75% of them were the children who flocked to this activity as evidenced by all the bricks drying in the sun.

March 12th Meeting: Garry Cantley, Regional Archaeologist, BIA Western Region, explained the 1979 Archaeological Resources Protection Act (ARPA), one of the federal government’s tools against looting of archaeological resources on federal and Indian land. In addition to giving us an overview of the law, he gave us several examples drawn from previous ARPA investigations. It was a good talk followed by a good Q&A session.

March 17th Field Trip to Cline Creek: Larry Morehouse from the Desert Foothills Chapter led 8 of us on a field trip to the Cline Creek area north of New River in the Tonto National Forest. It was a beautiful spring day and there were a lot of wildflowers in bloom. We drove in around 2 miles and parked and then hiked roughly a mile to a Hohokam site that was inhabited from about 900 to 1150 AD. There is a hilltop ruin (Room with a View) about 500 ft. above the site at the peak of the adjacent mountain. After exploring the area for a while we hiked back for part 2, a small but very unusual petroglyph site on a hilltop about 120 ft. above the main trail. This is an interesting area worthy of more exploration. A big Thank You to Larry.

Upcoming Tour: April 7th, 1 pm, Museum Tour to the Museum of the West, 3830 N Marshall Way, Scottsdale. Desert Foothills Chapter members Jim and Jan Patton, who are also docents at the Museum, will lead us on a tour of select exhibits. There is a wonderful exhibit of 65 pieces of Hopi yellow ware that includes works that are 500 years old, and 18 original Nampeyo works. Jim also suggests that we tour the 2nd floor exhibit, Courage and Crossroads, that includes a number of 19th century original artworks (e.g., Catlin, Bodmer, Arthur Jacob Miller) and some very interesting Plains Indian ethnographic pieces. Those two exhibits should occupy us for 60-90 minutes. There is free, time unlimited public parking behind the museum in the underground site via the east/west alley on the north side of the museum.  If 15 of us show up, we get a small group discount. Admission: Adults: $15; Seniors (65+) and Active Military: $13; Students (Full-time with ID): $8. Email Phyllis at 76desert@gmail.com to sign up. You must sign up in advance and your name must be on her list.  DO NOT JUST SHOW UP AT THE MUSEUM.  Phoenix Chapter members have priority, and your dues must have been paid for 2019. Limited to 30 people.

The Phoenix Chapter meets at 7 pm on the 2nd Tuesday of each month in the Community Room at the Pueblo Grande Museum, 4619 E. Washington St., Phoenix. We take the speaker to dinner at 5:30 pm at the Ruby Tuesday Restaurant on 44th Street and Washington just northwest of the museum. If you are interested in having dinner with the speaker, please call or email Marie (480-827-8070 or mbrit@cox.net) so that she can reserve a large enough table.

--Ellie Large

Phoenix March Chapter News

March 12th Meeting: Garry Cantley, Regional Archaeologist, BIA Western Region, will discuss the 1979 Archaeological Resources Protection Act (ARPA), one of the federal government’s tools against looting of archaeological resources on federal and Indian land. Besides giving an overview of the law, he will intersperse his presentation with examples drawn from previous ARPA investigations. Garry has over 40 years’ experience in archeology throughout many parts of North America. He received his undergraduate degree from the Universidad de las Americas in Cholula, Puebla, Mexico and an M.A. from Arizona State University. He has been with the Bureau of Indian Affairs in Phoenix since 1992 and  has received numerous awards for superior performance as Regional Archeologist for the Western Region. He received the Arizona Governor’s Archaeology Advisory Commission’s Award in Public Archaeology (Professional Archeologist) in 2013.

March 17th Field Trip (rescheduled from Feb. 24): Larry Morehouse from the Desert Foothills Chapter will take us to Cline Creek. There are both Hohokam and a couple of Apache petroglyphs and a habitation site. The petroglyphs are up the hill (of course), about a 10-minute climb. The village is up the wash about a mile. It is a moderate hike with some bushwhacking thru vegetation (including catclaw). There is no trail. Starting time will be between 7 and 9 am depending on how hot it is. This will be a 3 to 4 hour outing, plus your travel time to the New River area. Bring the usual: boots, hat, sun screen, long sleeves and pants, hiking stick, water, food, more water. High clearance only; no passenger cars, but we can carpool from the meeting place. 20 people maximum; Phoenix Chapter members have priority. Email Phyllis: 76desert@gmail.com to sign up

February 12th Meeting: Matt Peeples, Ph.D., ASU,  Archaeological Fakes and Frauds in Arizona and Beyond. Matt described several fantastic claims, such as the "Cardiff Giant," the "prehistoric" Acámbaro dinosaur figurines from Guanajuato, Mexico, and the Spanish treasure "found" near Tucson In addition to debunking these claims, he discussed how and why pseudoscientific claims take hold, what we can do about it, and why they  have the potential to do real damage to archaeological resources and the scientific process. For more info, go to http://www.badarchaeology.com/out-of-place-artefacts/mysterious-objects/the-acambaro-figurines.

Upcoming Meetings:

April 9       Andrea Gregory, ACS, Subsistence, Ceramic Production, and Exchange at Farmstead Sites on the Queen Creek Bajada

May 14      Erik Steinbach, Logan Simpson, How a River, a Terrace, and a Butte Influenced the Spatial Development of a Hohokam Village

The Phoenix Chapter meets at 7 pm on the 2nd Tuesday of each month in the Community Room at the Pueblo Grande Museum, 4619 E. Washington St., Phoenix. We will take the speaker to dinner at 5:30 pm at the Ruby Tuesday Restaurant on 44th Street and Washington just northwest of the museum. If you are interested in having dinner with the speaker, please call or email Marie (480-827-8070 or mbrit@cox.net) so that she can reserve a large enough table.

--Ellie Large

Phoenix February Chapter News

February 12th Meeting: Matt Peeples, Ph.D., ASU,  Archaeological Fakes and Frauds in Arizona and Beyond. Depictions of archaeology in popular culture are full of dubious tales of ancient extraterrestrials, lost civilizations, giants, and widespread scientific conspiracy. In this talk, Matt will explore such fantastic claims, focusing on a few popular claims here in our own backyard in Arizona. His goal is not to simply “debunk” these claims, though he will do that too, but to further explore how and why pseudoscientific claims take hold in the popular imagination and what we can do about it. Are such claims just silly fun, or do they do have the potential to do real damage to archaeological resources and the scientific process?

Matt is an assistant professor and archaeologist in the School of Human Evolution & Social Change at Arizona State University and co-director of the ASU Center for Archaeology and Society. He conducts field and lab research focused on the greater Cibola region in New Mexico and Arizona and also collaborates on a number of large projects focused on synthesizing settlement data from across the U.S. Southwest and Mexican Northwest. One of his major collaborative projects involves the use of social network analysis to explore how pre-Hispanic indigenous farmers survived and thrived in this unpredictable arid environment and what lessons their successes and failures can offer those of us living here today.

January 8th Meeting: The speaker at our January meeting was E. Charles Adams, Ph.D., who talked about 13,000 years of Migration in the Homol'ovi area. Six years of research on Rock Art Ranch near Winslow by Arizona State Museum archaeologists has documented human use going back to Clovis times. The ranch was a focus of intensive hunting, gathering, and small-scale agriculture during the Basketmaker II period from 1000 BCE to 500 CE. During the 1200s, Mogollon groups from the south built numerous small pueblos throughout the region and later joined Pueblo groups from the north to build and occupy the large Homol’ovi pueblos along the Little Colorado River. Evidence of this lengthy use is shown by the petroglyphs etched in the walls of Chevelon Canyon as well as by the different styles of projectile points made from both local and foreign stone sources and the change of these through time.

Upcoming Meetings:

March 12   Garry Cantley, BIA, Archaeological Resources and Crime Prevention and the Site Stewards

April 9        Andrea Gregory, ACS, Subsistence, Ceramic Production, and Exchange at Farmstead Sites on the Queen Creek Bajada

May 14      Erik Steinbach, Logan Simpson, How a River, a Terrace, and a Butte Influenced the Spatial Development of a Hohokam Village

February Field Trip:

Feb. 24: Larry Morehouse from the Desert Foothills Chapter will take us to Cline Creek. There are both Hohokam and a couple of Apache petroglyphs and a habitation site. The petroglyphs are up the hill (of course), about a 10-minute climb. The village is up the wash about a mile. It is a moderate hike with some bushwhacking thru vegetation (including catclaw). There is no trail. Starting time will be between 7 and 9 am depending on how hot it is. This will be a 3 to 4 hour outing, plus your travel time to the New River area. Bring the usual: boots, hat, sun screen, long sleeves and pants, hiking stick, water, food, more water. High clearance only; no passenger cars, but we can carpool from the meeting place. 20 people maximum; Phoenix Chapter members have priority. Email Phyllis: 76desert@gmail.com to sign up

January Field Trip: Jan. 21: Deer Flat Field Trip led by Scott Wood. The trip went well with 16 people showing up (including Scott). We had enough vehicles, no one fell or drove off the mesa. The road was really bad, I would never drive it. It was cold and windy.

Teotihuacan Exhibit Tour: Jan. 13: Docent-led tour of Teotihuacan: City of Water, City of Fire exhibit at the Phoenix Art Museum. The tour was great, with 14 AAS members managing to find parking spaces and get into the museum for the tour. It was very crowded because it was a free Sunday, but the docent was very knowledgeable and made the best of the situation. Several people tagged along that weren't in our group, which we knew might happen. Most of the group remained after the hour-long tour and took the time to see the wonderful treasures on display (as well as the gift shop). 

--Ellie Large

Phoenix January Chapter News

January 8th Meeting: The speaker at our January meeting will be E. Charles Adams, Ph.D., who will talk about 13,000 years of Migration in the Homol'ovi area. Six years of research on Rock Art Ranch near Winslow by Arizona State Museum archaeologists has documented human use going back to Clovis times. The ranch was also a focus of intensive hunting, gathering, and small-scale agriculture during the Basketmaker II period from 1000 BCE to 500 CE. During the 1200s, Mogollon groups from the south built numerous small pueblos throughout the region and later joined Pueblo groups from the north to build and occupy the large Homol’ovi pueblos along the Little Colorado River. Evidence of this lengthy use is etched in the walls of Chevelon Canyon. This talk traces the fascinating history of population movement that truly made the area a cultural crossroads.

Since 1985, Dr. Adams has been Curator of Archaeology at the Arizona State Museum and a Professor in the School of Anthropology, University of Arizona, a position from which he retired at the end of 2017. From his arrival, he directed the Homol’ovi Research Program, which involved extensive survey and excavation of numerous pueblos in Homolovi State Park from 1985 to 2006. From 2011 to 2016, he directed survey and excavations on and near Rock Art Ranch, 25 miles southeast of Winslow. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Colorado, Boulder, in 1975. Prior to 1985 he was Senior Archaeologist at the Museum of Northern Arizona and the Director of Research at Crow Canyon Archaeological Center. He has published nearly 100 articles and book chapters and authored or edited ten books or monographs, the most recent being Chevelon: Pueblo at Blue Running Water, volume 211 in the ASM Archaeological Series published in 2016.

December 11th Meeting: Our Holiday Potluck was well attended, with a total of 40 arriving by the time the talk began. Many members showed up early to help set up the room, which was made easier by the work that the PGM staff had done before we arrived. Several also stayed afterward to help with cleanup. All of their help is greatly appreciated. Before the talk began we held the annual election for the Phoenix Board. The following officers were elected: President/Programs: Ellie Large; Exec. VP: Eric Feldman; Treasurer: Bob Unferth; Secretary: Ellen Martin; Archivist: Marie Britton; 1 yr. Dir: Vicki Caltabiano; 2 yr. Dir.: Nancy Unferth; 3 yr. Dir:  Phyllis Smith; Archaeology Advisor - Laurene Montero.

Our speaker was Will G. Russell (Ph.D., ASU),  a Historic Preservation Specialist with the Az Dept. of Transportation He gave an interesting talk on Ritual Racing and the Bringing of Rain to North-Central Arizona, explaining how linear ground features called racetracks are defined and discussed their distribution and their similarities and variations between sites. Between 2007 and 2014, Arizona State University’s Racetrack Project located, recorded, and studied these tracks in order to better understand the role of ritual in the region's thirteenth and fourteenth century social changes. Between A.D. 1250 and 1450, a large number of ceremonial racetracks were built at and between villages in north-central Arizona. Originally the racetracks were relatively dispersed, stretching from the Sedona area down to Cave Creek and from the eastern base of the Bradshaw Mountains to the Mazatzal Wilderness. Over time, the racetrack network grew in intensity but became spatially focused atop Perry Mesa, along the middle Agua Fria River.

Because no other forms of communal architecture (such as ballcourts or great kivas) had been identified on Perry Mesa, Dr. Katherine Spielmann and Russell discussed the possibility that these clearings may have filled such a role and developed a research strategy. Russel looked for additional tracks in central Arizona and compared them to similar features elsewhere in an attempt to determine their prehispanic distribution and purpose. Although ceremonial racing has been documented in every Native American group studied in the historic Southwest, ethnographic research showed that the linear features of Perry Mesa were most similar to permanent ceremonial racetracks in the Eastern Pueblo (northern Rio Grande) region. Ritual racing was a form of prayer, most often for rain, and can be seen as a form of self-sacrifice; runners demonstrated their commitment to the community through performance and suffering.  Racing also helped to integrate communities: clans, moieties, kiva groups, and other societies periodically congregated for ritual races. This reminded individuals that despite various group memberships, they were all part of the same larger community. (For more info, see Keeping Track: Ceremonial Racetracks, Integration, and Change in Central Arizona by Will G. Russell. In Alliance and Landscape on Perry Mesa in the Fourteenth Century, edited by David R. Abbott and Katherine Spielmann, pp. 161-185, University of Utah Press, Salt Lake City.

Upcoming Meetings:

Feb. 12      Matt Peeples, Ph.D., ASU,  Archaeological Fakes and Frauds in Arizona and Beyond

March 12   Garry Cantley, BIA, Archaeological Resources and Crime Prevention and the Site Stewards

Field Trips:

Jan. 13: Docent-led tour of Teotihuacan: City of Water, City of Fire exhibit at the Phoenix Art Museum. Tour limited to 15. This tour is an AAS field trip. Anyone who goes on it must be an AAS member for 2019. If you did not sign up at the December meeting, you must sign up in advance by emailing Phyllis at 76desert@gmail.com. If you have not signed up in advance, you won't be allowed to join the tour. (You will also have to sign the AAS release/waiver form before going on this tour.)

Jan. 21: MLK Day - Scott Wood is taking us to Deer Flat on the worst road we've ever seen. Open to all AAS members, with Phoenix chapter members having priority.

The Phoenix Chapter meets at 7 pm on the 2nd Tuesday of each month in the Community Room at the Pueblo Grande Museum, 4619 E. Washington St., Phoenix. We will take the speaker to dinner at 5:30 pm at the Ruby Tuesday Restaurant on 44th Street and Washington just northwest of the museum. If you are interested in having dinner with the speaker, please call or email Marie (480-827-8070 or mbrit@cox.net) so that she can reserve a large enough table.

--Ellie Large

Phoenix December Chapter News

December 11th Meeting: Our Holiday Potluck begins at 6 pm with meats, rolls and beverages provided by the chapter. If joining us for the potluck, please bring a side dish or dessert to share. After dinner there will be a short business meeting including elections for the 2019 Chapter Board.

We could use some help setting up for the dinner after 5 pm (moving tables and chairs - bring your gloves). We could also use some help putting on the tablecloths and decorating - the people who came early last year were a big help!

The presentation will begin about 7:30 pm. Our speaker will be Will G. Russell, Ph. D, a Historic Preservation Specialist with the Az Dept. of Transportation; his topic is: Ritual Racing and the Bringing of Rain to North-Central Arizona. Between A.D. 1250 and 1450, a large number of ceremonial racetracks were built at and between villages in north-central Arizona. Originally the racetracks were relatively dispersed, stretching from the Sedona area down to Cave Creek and from the Bradshaw Mountains to the Mazatzal Wilderness. Over time, the racetrack network grew in intensity but became spatially focused atop Perry Mesa, along the middle Agua Fria River. Between 2007 and 2014, Arizona State University’s Racetrack Project located, recorded, and studied these tracks in order to better understand the role of ritual in the region's thirteenth and fourteenth century social changes.

Dr. Russell has worked in Southwestern archaeology for over a decade. His research focused on the Mimbres region of southwestern New Mexico and the Perry Mesa region of north-central Arizona. His research examined the early development of social inequality through the lens of ritual practice. Will is a Historic Preservation Specialist for the Arizona Department of Transportation. He is also an Adjunct Professor with Arizona State University and a Research Associate with the Center for Archaeology and Diversity.

November Meeting: The speaker for our Nov. 13th meeting was Pearce Paul Creasman, PhD, UA, who talked about Ancient Egypt's 25th Dynasty and The Pyramid Field/Royal Cemetery at Nuri, Sudan. After ancient Egypt’s New Kingdom collapsed, kings from Nubia unified the lands and led the empire out of the doldrums to its last flourish of pharaonic greatness. The Nubian kings seem to have originated from the little-known site of Napata in modern Sudan, today a UNESCO World Heritage Site. With some 20 existing pyramids, Nuri is the largest royal Napatan cemetery; it served as the resting place for at least 60 kings and queens. The first royal buried was the biblical pharaoh Taharqa, savior of Jerusalem (2 Kings 19:9), and his descendants used the site for four more centuries. Although Nuri was partly excavated in the 1910s, it remains poorly published and largely unexplored. As a result of climate change and the construction of dams along the Nile, rising groundwater has submerged many of its tombs, likely including all of the subterranean pyramid chambers of the kings. At least four kings’ burial chambers remain unexcavated, albeit underwater. His lecture told the tale of the pharaohs of ancient Egypt’s 25th Dynasty, and the current effort by the University of Arizona to better understand them via underwater archaeological excavations in the pyramid field of Nuri.

January Meeting: Jan. 8, Charles Adams, Ph.D., ASM, 13,000 years of Migration in the Homol'ovi area.

Field Trips:

Dec. 2      Field trip to Oatman Point led by Phyllis Smith.

Jan. 21     (MLK Day) Scott Wood is taking us to Deer Flat on the worst road we've ever seen. Phoenix Chapter members have priority, but they should sign up as soon as possible.

Upcoming Conference at PGM: The first  Southern Southwest Archaeological Conference will be held on Jan. 11 & 12. Dr. Randall McGuire, SUNY Binghamton, will give the keynote talk at 6 pm on Jan. 11. For the schedule of talks and to register, go to their website, sswac.org .

The Phoenix Chapter meets at 7 pm on the 2nd Tuesday of each month in the Community Room at the Pueblo Grande Museum, 4619 E. Washington St., Phoenix. We will take the speaker to dinner at 5:30 pm at the Ruby Tuesday Restaurant on 44th Street and Washington just northwest of the museum. If you are interested in having dinner with the speaker, please call or email Marie (480-827-8070 or mbrit@cox.net) so that she can reserve a large enough table.

--Ellie Large

Phoenix November Chapter News


November Meeting: The speaker for our Nov. 13th meeting will be Paul Creasman, PhD, UA, who will talk about Ancient Egypt's 25th Dynasty and The Pyramid Field/Royal Cemetery at Nuri,  Sudan. After ancient Egypt’s New Kingdom collapsed, kings from Nubia unified the lands and led the empire out of the doldrums to its last flourish of pharaonic greatness. The Nubian kings seem to have originated from the little-known site of Napata in modern Sudan, today a UNESCO World Heritage Site. With some 20 existing pyramids, Nuri is the largest royal Napatan cemetery; it served as the resting place for at least 60 kings and queens. The first royal buried was the biblical pharaoh Taharqa, savior of Jerusalem (2 Kings 19:9), and his descendants used the site for four more centuries. Although Nuri was partly excavated in the 1910s, it remains poorly published and largely unexplored. As a result of climate change and the construction of dams along the Nile, rising groundwater has submerged many of its tombs, likely including all of the subterranean pyramid chambers of the kings. At least four kings’ burial chambers remain unexcavated. This lecture tells the tale of the pharaohs of ancient Egypt’s 25th Dynasty, and the current effort by the University of Arizona to better understand them via underwater archaeological excavations in the pyramid field of Nuri.

Dr. Creasman is an Associate Professor of Egyptian Archaeology and Dendrochronology at the University of Arizona as well as the Curator of the Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research and the Director of the University of Arizona Egyptian Expedition. His research interests include the study human and environment interactions, maritime archaeology, dendroarchaeology, and Egyptian archaeology. He received his B.A. in Anthropology and Philosophy from the University of Maine in 2003, his M.A. in Anthropology from Texas A&M University in 2005 and his Ph.D. in Anthropology & Nautical Archaeology from Texas A&M University in 2010.

October 9th Meeting: Michael E. Smith, Ph.D., ASU, gave us a short history of Teotihuacan, including the results of several tunnels that archaeologists have recently dug under the pyramids. The talk was intended to provide background for the current exhibit at the Phoenix Art Museum, Teotihuacan: City of Water, City of Fire, a major traveling exhibition which will be on display in the Steele Gallery from Oct. 6 to Jan. 27, 2019. The audience enjoyed the talk and asked numerous questions afterwards.

The Phoenix Chapter meets at 7 pm on the 2nd Tuesday of each month in the Community Room at the Pueblo Grande Museum, 4619 E. Washington St., Phoenix. We will take the speaker to dinner at 5:30 pm at the Ruby Tuesday Restaurant on 44th Street and Washington just northwest of the museum. If you are interested in having dinner with the speaker, please call or email Marie (480-827-8070 or mbrit@cox.net) so that she can reserve a large enough table.

--Ellie Large

October Phoenix Chapter News

October 9th Meeting: Michael E. Smith, Ph.D., ASU, presents Teotihuacan: A World City in Ancient Mexico. "World city” indicates a city in touch with the world, operating on a world level; for ancient Mexico, the “world” was Mesoamerica. This talk will explore the art and archaeology of this ancient “world city” and will focus on recent archaeological research that is transforming our views of the city. This talk is intended to provide background for the current exhibit at the Phoenix Art Museum, Teotihuacan: City of Water, City of Fire, a major traveling exhibition which will be on display in the Steele Gallery from Oct. 6 to Jan. 27, 2019.

Teotihuacan stood out in Classic-period Mesoamerica for its size, complexity, and influence in distant areas; Teotihuacan traded and interacted with all corners of Mesoamerica, and the city held great prestige for the distant Maya kings. Teotihuacan was the first, largest, and most influential metropolis on the American continent. In its heyday between 100 BCE and 650 CE, the city encompassed an area of 15 square kilometers with a population of around 140,000. Who inhabited Teotihuacan, its original name, and why it was abandoned are still unknowns. When the Aztecs came into the Valley of Mexico from the north in the first half of the 14th century, they discovered its ruins, named it Teotihuacan, the place where the gods were born, and used it as the setting for their own creation myth.

Michael E. Smith, Ph.D., has been a Professor in the ASU School of Human Evolution & Social Change since 2005 and became Director of the ASU Teotihuacan Research Laboratory in 2015. He has directed numerous fieldwork projects at Aztec sites in central Mexico, pioneering the excavation of houses and the study of daily life. He has published six books and numerous scholarly articles on the Aztecs, including The Aztecs (3rd ed., 2012), Aztec City-State Capitals (2008), At Home with the Aztecs (2016), and Rethinking the Aztec Economy (co-edited by Nichols, Berdan & Smith, 2017).

Upcoming Field Trip: Eric Feldman is setting up a group tour to see the Teotihuacan: City of Water, City of Fire exhibit at the Phoenix Art Museum sometime between Oct. 6, 2018 and Jan. 27, 2019.

September 11th Meeting: Retired National Park Service Superintendent Charles R. “Butch” Farabee presented El Camino del Diablo, The Devil's Highway (also called The Road of the Dead). Having driven this remote, four-wheel drive road six times, he presented a good overall view of this fascinating but humbling area and the life-sustaining granite rock tank pools, called tinajas, hidden at the base of nondescript mountains along the trail. The most important of these life-sustaining pools was the Tinajas Altas, where hundreds of bedrock mortars, as well as numerous petroglyphs, pictographs and related evidence testify to the use of this area, probably from even long before Father Kino, De Anza and then, Spanish miners, passed nearby. Hundreds of graves were once scattered along El Camino but are now mostly gone, obliterated by time, wind, sand, and often, man. In Arizona, The Devil’s Highway is now used mainly by the U.S. Border Patrol. It traverses Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument, the Cabeza Prieta National Wildlife Refuge, and the Barry M. Goldwater Bombing Range, with little sections of land owned by the State of Arizona and the U. S. Bureau of Land Management, thrown in.

Fall Meeting Schedule:

Nov. 13  Paul Creasman, PhD, UA, Ancient Egypt's 25th Dynasty and The Pyramid Field/Royal Cemetery at Nuri,  Sudan.

Dec. 11   Holiday Potluck and 2019 Elections. Speaker TBD.

Upcoming Events:

Oct. 3:     6:30 pm, PGM, Phoenix, Talk: City of Phoenix Archaeology: Why we do what we do, by. Laurene Montero, Phoenix City Archaeologist.

Oct. 19:   2018 Annual Arizona Archaeological Council Fall Conference, Arizona History Museum, Tucson

Oct. 20:   AAS Fall State Meeting, Mazatzal Hotel & Casino, Payson, Az

The Phoenix Chapter meets at 7 pm on the 2nd Tuesday of each month in the Community Room at the Pueblo Grande Museum, 4619 E. Washington St., Phoenix. We will take the speaker to dinner at 5:30 pm at the Ruby Tuesday Restaurant on 44th Street and Washington just northwest of the museum. If you are interested in having dinner with the speaker, please call or email Marie (480-827-8070 or mbrit@cox.net) so that she can reserve a large enough table.

--Ellie Large

September Phoenix Chapter News

Retired National Park Service Superintendent Charles R. “Butch” Farabee presents El Camino del Diablo, The Devil's Highway. Also called The Road of the Dead, The Devil's Highway is a brutal, 200-mile long, prehistoric and historic route from northern Sonora to Yuma and then on to the mission areas of California. Used for at least a millennium by Native Americans, conquistadores, Father Kino, miners, undocumented aliens, and modern-day adventurers, the highway crosses three large federal areas in the extreme desert of southern Arizona. Approx. 400 to 2,000 lives have been lost traveling along our very own, isolated and wild part of the Arizona-Mexico border, most from heat, exposure, and a desperate lack of water. Join Butch Farabee, who has driven this remote, four-wheel drive road six times, for a part history, part travelogue, and part informational overview of this fascinating but humbling area.

Early travelers on El Camino - on foot, horseback and wagon until the first automobile in 1915 - often began in Caborca, Sonora, 40 miles south of the border. Leaving this then frontier village and its permanent little river, they encountered only one more certain source of water between there and the Colorado River. If lucky, they could find water further on, standing in a handful of granite rock tanks, hidden at the base of nondescript mountains along the next 125 miles. The most important of these life-sustaining pools was the Tinajas Altas. Hundreds of bedrock mortars, as well as numerous petroglyphs, pictographs and related evidence, testify to the use of this area, probably even long before Father Kino, De Anza and then, Spanish miners, passed nearby. Graves, possibly numbering in the hundreds, were once scattered along El Camino but are now mostly gone, obliterated by time, wind, sand, and often, man. In Arizona, The Devil’s Highway, now used mainly by the U.S. Border Patrol, traverses Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument, the Cabeza Prieta National Wildlife Refuge, and the Barry M. Goldwater Bombing Range, with little sections of land owned by the State of Arizona and the U. S. Bureau of Land Management, thrown in.

Charles R. “Butch” Farabee grew up in Tucson, was very active in Scouting and the out-of-doors; he graduated from Tucson High School in 1960 and then the University of Arizona. He has a Bachelor of Science in Zoology and a Master of Arts in Public Administration and is a graduate of the FBI Academy. He spent 35 years with the National Park Service as a field ranger and then superintendent in 10 different park areas including Sequoia, Grand Canyon, Glen Canyon, Lake Mead, Death Valley, Yosemite, Glacier and Washington, DC. He has had four books published but is mostly just the very proud father of two sons and their families. He has driven this remote, four-wheel drive road six times, and will give us a part-history, part-travelogue, and part-informational overview of this fascinating but humbling area.

Fall Meeting Schedule:

Oct. 9:      Michael E. Smith, Ph.D., ASU, Teotihuacan: A World City in Ancient Mexico. "World city” indicates a city in touch with the world, operating on a world level; for ancient Mexico, the “world” was Mesoamerica. The exhibit Teotihuacan: City of Water, City of Fire is coming to the Phoenix Art Museum, Oct. 6, 2018 - Jan. 27, 2019. We are setting up a group tour.

Nov. 13:  Paul Creasman, PhD, UA, Ancient Egypt's 25th Dynasty and The Pyramid Field/Royal Cemetery at Nuri,  Sudan.

Dec. 11:   Holiday Potluck and 2019 Elections. Speaker TBD.

The Phoenix Chapter meets at 7 pm on the 2nd Tuesday of each month in the Community Room at the Pueblo Grande Museum, 4619 E. Washington St., Phoenix. We will take the speaker to dinner at 5:30 pm at the Ruby Tuesday Restaurant on 44th Street and Washington just northwest of the museum. If you are interested in having dinner with the speaker, please call or email Marie (480-827-8070 or mbrit@cox.net) so that she can reserve a large enough table.

--Ellie Large

March Phoenix Chapter News

March Meeting: The speaker for our March 13th meeting will be Todd Bostwick, Ph.D.; his topic is 15,000 Years of Archaeology on Sicily: Cultural Crossroads of the Mediterranean. The island of Sicily has a rich archaeological heritage dating back to the Upper Pleistocene, when Sicily was connected to the mainland, allowing humans and animals to migrate to the region, and numerous caves contain their cave art. Later Neolithic farmers made beautiful incised pottery and participated in extensive trade networks, including obsidian from two nearby islands. During the Bronze Age, thousands of tombs were cut into the limestone cliffs, providing insight into ancient concepts of the afterlife. Around 700 BC, substantial Phoenician and Greek colonies were established; their ruins contain some the best preserved Greek temples in existence today. Roman ruins are also well represented, including the famous villa of Piazza Armerina, where hundreds of remarkable mosaic floors were preserved, depicting the daily life of Roman royalty.

Dr. Bostwick has been conducting archaeological research in the Southwest for 37 years and was the Phoenix City Archaeologist for 21 years. He is now the Director of Archaeology at the Verde Valley Archaeology Center. He has an MA in Anthropology and a PhD in History from ASU, and taught classes at both ASU and NAU for several years. He has published numerous books and articles on Southwest archaeology and history, and his projects have received awards from the National Park Service, the Arizona Governor’s Archaeology Advisory Commission, and the Arizona Archaeological Society. More importantly, he visits archaeological sites around the world and always documents his travels with photographs and research so that he can provide us with an entertaining and educational experience.

February Meeting: Aaron Wright, Ph.D., presented The Western Range of the Red-on-Buff Culture, Redux. He explained the history of archaeological research on the western boundary of the Hohokam area between the prehistoric Colorado River peoples and the Hohokam who lived along the Gila and Salt Rivers. Both groups produced paddle-and-anvil buffwares, and in some time periods groups from the Colorado River lived alongside the Hohokam in the same villages, probably intermarrying. In more recent historic times the Pee-Posh (Opa or Cocomaricopa) took refuge with the Akimel O'otam (Pima) on the Gila River and are co-resident with them on the Gila River Indian Reservation and on the Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Reservation.

April Book Sale: Each year we conduct several fund-raising events to benefit the Pueblo Grande Museum. We will have a book sale at our April 10th meeting to help members dispose of the numerous books, journals and magazines they have acquired through the years or to pick up the volumes missing from their collection. So bring all your unwanted bounty of books to the April meeting!

Hikes & Field Trips:

April 22nd Field trip to Tumamoc Hill. The trip costs $300 and is limited to 20 people, so the cost would be $15 a person if we have 20 people. We have to pay in advance so checks should be made out to the chapter prior to April 22. AAS members only. Details will be forthcoming. To sign up send Phyllis an email at 76desert@gmail.com.

Feb. 10th Field Trip to Hummingbird Point. The trip to Hummingbird Point was led by Jolanta Sokol and Michael Clinton. Nine people went including Jolanta and Michael.

Upcoming Events:

March 1, 7 pm, SWAT Meeting, AzMNH, Mesa: Talk by Chris Caseldine on The analysis of a possible Polvoron phase pithouse on top of the Mesa Grande platform mound.

March 5-8, 5th Tri-National Symposium: Celebrating the Sonoran Desert, Ajo

March 6, 5:30 pm, Archaeology Café: The Salt River and Irrigation: 1,000 Years of Bringing the Valley to Life by geoarchaeologist Gary Huckleberry, Ph.D.

March 10, All day: Archaeology Expo at Arizona Museum of Natural History, Mesa.

Spring Meeting Schedule:

Apr. 10     Ethan Ortega, Archaeologist, Coronado Historic Site, Bernalillo, NM. False Truths, Restored Ruins, and New Artifacts: Looking Beyond the Oxymoronic Past of Coronado Historic Site through Field Work

May 8       Dan Liponi, Kumeyaay/Patayan pictographs w/book signing. See ww.larumorosarockart.com.

The Phoenix Chapter meets at 7 pm on the 2nd Tuesday of each month in the Community Room at the Pueblo Grande Museum, 4619 E. Washington St., Phoenix. We will take the speaker to dinner at 5:30 pm at the Ruby Tuesday Restaurant on 44th Street and Washington just northwest of the museum. If you are interested in having dinner with the speaker, please call or email Marie (480-827-8070 or mbrit@cox.net) so that she can reserve a large enough table.

--Ellie Large

February  Phoenix Chapter News

February Meeting: Aaron Wright, Ph.D., will present The Western Range of the Red-on-Buff Culture, Redux. Prehistoric Southwestern Arizona is the interface between Patayan and Hohokam material culture and settlement patterns and, presumably, the ways-of-life that are tied to each of those traditions. Still, the western frontier of the Hohokam World remains little studied and is therefore poorly defined. This presentation reviews the history of research on this topic, revisiting the development and eventual demise of primary Hohokam villages along the lower Gila River. In contemporary perspective, this historical trajectory raises important questions about ethnic diversity, co-residence, and conflict.

Aaron is a Preservation Archaeologist at Archaeology Southwest, Tucson. He earned an MA in 2006 and a PhD in 2011, both from Washington State University. His research is currently focused on the Hohokam and Patayan traditions in southwestern Arizona. He is specifically interested in the cultural landscape of the lower Gila River, which is renowned for a unique mixture of Patayan and Hohokam settlements, dense galleries of world-class rock art, and numerous enigmatic geoglyphs. Aaron is the lead researcher on Archaeology Southwest’s long-term goal of establishing a Great Bend of the Gila National Monument. He is a co-editor of Leaving Mesa Verde: Peril and Change in the Thirteenth-Century Southwest (University of Arizona Press, 2010) and author of Religion on the Rocks: Hohokam Rock Art, Ritual Practice, and Social Transformation (University of Utah Press, 2014), which won the 2012 Don D. and Catherine S. Fowler Book Prize. His most recent co-authored work is the The Great Bend of the Gila: Contemporary Native American Connections to an Ancestral Landscape (Archaeology Southwest, 2016).

January Meeting: Chris Garraty, Assistant Director of Cultural Resources for Logan Simpson, gave a very interesting talk explaining how recent archaeological and historical investigations at the Hohokam site of La Plaza revealed evidence that a Sedentary period platform mound once stood in the north part of ASU’s Tempe campus near Wells Fargo Arena. He showed us a sequence of maps from the late 1800s and early 1900s that documented three Hohokam platform mounds within La Plaza. These mounds had been leveled by the early to mid-1900s, and archaeologists could only approximate their locations based on old maps of dubious accuracy. An earlier investigation showed tentative evidence for a platform mound in the north campus location, and a more recent investigation corroborated and refined that information. Multiple lines of evidence were used to determine the location of the platform mound: examination of historical photographs, a reconstruction of the ancient surface grade, and a comparison of ancillary features from known platform mound contexts. The analysis of ancillary features beneath and adjacent to the inferred mound footprint provided new insights into the organization of public space in La Plaza and, more broadly, the mobilization of labor for communal construction projects in Hohokam society.

Spring Meeting Schedule:

Mar. 13    Todd Bostwick, VVAC, 5,000 Years of Archaeology in Sicily: Crossroads of the Mediterranean

Apr. 10     Ethan Ortega, NPS Ranger, Coronado Historic Site, Bernalillo, NM. False Truths, Restored Ruins, and New Artifacts: Looking Beyond the Oxymoronic Past of Coronado Historic Site through Field Work

May 8       Dan Liponi, Kumeyaay/Patayan pictographs w/book signing. See ww.larumorosarockart.com.

The Phoenix Chapter meets at 7 pm on the 2nd Tuesday of each month in the Community Room at the Pueblo Grande Museum, 4619 E. Washington St., Phoenix. We will take the speaker to dinner at 5:30 pm at the Ruby Tuesday Restaurant on 44th Street and Washington just northwest of the museum. If you are interested in having dinner with the speaker, please call or email Marie (480-827-8070 or mbrit@cox.net) so that she can reserve a large enough table.

--Ellie Large

January Chapter News

January Meeting: Chris Garraty, Ph.D., Assistant Director of Cultural Resources, Logan Simpson, will present Relocating the Platform Mound at La Plaza: Recent Archaeological Investigations on ASU’s Tempe Campus. Recent archaeological and historical investigations at the Hohokam site of La Plaza revealed evidence that a Classic period platform mound once stood in the north part of ASU’s Tempe campus near Wells Fargo Arena. Maps from the late 1800s and early 1900s documented three Hohokam platform mounds within La Plaza. These mounds were leveled by the early to mid-1900s, and archaeologists can only approximate their locations based on old maps of dubious accuracy. An earlier investigation showed tentative evidence for a platform mound in the north campus location, and a more recent investigation corroborates and refines that finding. Multiple lines of evidence were used to determine the location of the platform mound: examination of historical photographs, a reconstruction of the ancient surface grade, and a comparison of ancillary features from known platform mound contexts. Analysis of ancillary features beneath and adjacent to the inferred mound footprint provides new insights into the organization of public space in La Plaza and, more broadly, the mobilization of labor for communal construction projects in Hohokam society.

Chris received his PhD in Anthropology from ASU in 2006 and his BA in Anthropology from Temple University in 1994 and is currently an adjunct faculty member at ASU. While at ASU he worked on the Teotihuacan Mapping Project with Dr. George Cowgill and on the Mixtequilla Archaeological Project in Veracruz with Dr. Barbara Stark. After receiving his PhD he worked as a Project Director at  Statistical Research in Tucson for several years and as a Project Manager for the Gila River Indian Community Cultural Resource Management Program for several more years before joining Logan Simpson. He has authored and co-authored numerous journal articles on his work in Arizona and Mexico, and co-edited with Dr. Stark the book Archaeological Approaches to Market Exchange in Ancient Societies published by the University Press of Colorado in May 2010.

December Meeting: Our Holiday Potluck featured ham, delicious shredded beef, tasty meatballs, and a variety of great side dishes and desserts. It was well attended and the meal was followed by an excellent presentation on Montezuma Castle: New Discoveries and Native American Traditional Knowledge at Montezuma Castle National Monument by Matt Guebard, an NPS Ranger stationed at Tuzigoot. Matt explained how he combined archaeological information with Native American oral histories to interpret the abandonment of Castle A and Montezuma Castle, two large pueblo sites located near Camp Verde. Archaeological data and traditional knowledge suggest that both sites were abandoned following a large and destructive fire at Castle A. Archaeological evidence suggests this event occurred in the late 14th century and included arson and physical violence, both of which were corroborated by Native American histories.

A drawing was held at the end of the night for a special door prize as well as the table decorations. Laurene Montero, our Chapter Advisor, conducted the election of officers for next year's board. Our board for 2018 is President/Programs - Ellie Large; Exec. VP/Cert. Rep. - Marie Britton; Treasurer - Bob Unferth; Secretary - Ellen Martin; 1 yr. Dir/Membership - Nancy Unferth; 2 yr. Dir./Girl Scouts - Vicki Erhart; 3 yr. Dir/Field Trips - Phyllis Smith. If anyone would like to join the board or to attend a board meeting, please call or email one of our current board members. Contact information is on the Phoenix Chapter page of the AAS website, azarchsoc.org/Phoenix.

December Hike: On Dec. 16th several members joined the Rim Country Chapter to hike to the Zulu petroglyph site near Rye as well as the Oxbow Ruin. The hike was led by J. J. Golio.

Obituaries: We found out recently via an Arizona Republic obituary that long-time member Don Ketchum passed away on Sept. 29, 2017, and that his wife, Jeanne, also a long-time member, had passed away on Nov. 15, 2014. They were very active members and always helped out at the Chili Booth and the Park of the Four Waters cleanup.

Spring Meeting Schedule:

Feb. 13     Aaron Wright, ASW, The Western Range of the Red-on-Buff Culture, Redux

Mar. 13    Todd Bostwick, VVAC, 5,000 Years of Archaeology in Sicily: Crossroads of the Mediterranean

Apr. 10     Ethan Ortega, NPS Ranger, Coronado Historic Site, Bernalillo, NM. False Truths, Restored Ruins, and New Artifacts: Looking Beyond the Oxymoronic Past of Coronado Historic Site through Field Work

May 8       Dan Liponi, Kumeyaay/Patayan pictographs w/book signing. See www.larumorosarockart.com.

The Phoenix Chapter meets at 7 pm on the 2nd Tuesday of each month in the Community Room at the Pueblo Grande Museum, 4619 E. Washington St., Phoenix. We will take the speaker to dinner at 5:30 pm at the Ruby Tuesday Restaurant on 44th Street and Washington just northwest of the museum. If you are interested in having dinner with the speaker, please call or email Marie (480-827-8070 or mbrit@cox.net) so that she can reserve a large enough table.

--Ellie Large

 

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