Arizona Archaeological Society

 

 
 

AAS Government Activity

The protection and study of archaeological sites is key to our understanding of the ancient Peoples of the Southwest. Aspects of that protection may be controversial to various groups. Government regulations regarding archaeology are constantly under attack by one group or another. The AAS strives to be knowledgeable of the actions by Governmental agencies and the Arizona legislature in regard to matter that may impact the protection of archaeological sites

AAS Historical Government Positions   <<<Click here to view AAS historical positions

 



Governor's Archaeology Advisory Council (GAAC)

Arizona is a national leader in the development of Public Archaeology and Heritage Tourism programs. The Governor's Archaeology Advisory Commission has played an important role in the development of Arizona's multi-component, award-winning educational programs in archaeology. The legislation creating the Commission was signed into effect by Governor Bruce Babbitt on March 26, 1985. The purpose of the Commission is to advise the State Historic Preservation Office on a variety of archaeological issues important to Arizona.

The Commission is charged with advising SHPO on:

  • Conducting public education programs to promote archaeology and to inform the public on archaeological issues;
  • Fostering archaeological law enforcement activities to stop pot-hunting and other activities that damage archaeological sites;
  • The development of a state plan to protect archaeological sites, including the acquisition of sites and the development of archaeological preserves;
  • Developing mechanisms to assist private owners of archaeological sites in protecting and managing their sites;
  • Fostering continued study of Arizona's archaeology to contribute to a better understanding of our cultural history, and
  • Archaeological activities and related issues within the State.

The Arizona Archaeological Society regularly attends the GAAC meetings to be aware of current activities that may impact the mission of the GAAC and to provide input.




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