Arizona Archaeological Society

 

 
 

Phoenix Chapter

 Ric Alling holding the moon

Ric Alling "Holding the Moon"

November

The speaker for our Nov. 13th meeting will be Ric Alling, Director, Marston Exploration Theater, ASU. He will talk about Applied Archaeoastronomy in the American Southwest. Ric is the inaugural director of the ASU’s newly opened Marston Exploration Theater, a facility that uses the next generation of Planetarium technologies to render images in 3D stereographic space. Ric’s interest in preparation and delivery of science themes in public settings derives from a B. A. in Interdisciplinary Studies in Theater and in Anthropology from ASU while continuing to work toward an M.A. in Museum Studies at the School of Human Evolution and Social Change.

Archaeoastronomers seek to identify and document how prehistoric peoples imbedded astronomical knowledge in their material culture. While many sites demonstrate astronomical ‘awareness’, proof of the refined notion of ‘astronomical knowledge’ remains vexing. Astronomical knowledge requires demonstrating the use of celestial observation as a tool. It is difficult enough to identify with certainty a purposeful alignment; inferring the reason for that alignment is many times more difficult. A case study from an investigation at Wupatki National Monument will be used to examine a suspected alignment, considering the celestial mechanics that interact with the alignment, and the reasonableness of this case as an archaeoastronomic event marker.

October Meeting: Doug Newton, the speaker for our October meeting, took us on a virtual tour of the Eagletail Mountain petroglyphs which was much appreciated by those who won’t be able to join Doug’s tour to see the them on Sunday, Oct. 26. The panels were amazing.

Upcoming Meetings:

Dec. 11 - Todd Bostwick, Interpreting the Nazca Lines: Enigmatic Images of the Peruvian Desert. (Our Holiday Potluck)

Feb. 12 - Chris Reed, Agua Fria Chapter, Natural Bridges National Monument - Living on the Edge. 

Upcoming Hike:

Nov. 15 or Dec. 20 - Hike to view the 19th Ave and Greenway petroglyph site in Phoenix. It is easy to drive to and has adequate parking but there will be some scrambling to see the glyphs. More details will be emailed to all chapter members.

Spring - The South Mountain Hieroglyphic Canyon hike that was scheduled for Oct. 26th following the state meeting had to be cancelled. It will be rescheduled for this spring. Stay tuned!

--Ellie Large 

**For chapter news  from earlier this year, go to the bottom of this page.

Phoenix Chapter Membership Form.pdf 

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Introduction

The Arizona Archaeological Society, Phoenix Chapter, is an independent nonprofit corporation. Members are eligible to participate in field trips, excavations, surveys, lab work, and other areas of archaeological interest. Each member also receives a copy of the annual publication of the Society, The Arizona Archaeologist, together with the monthly newsletter, The Petroglyph.

Chapter Officers


Office Office Holder Telephone    Email Address
President Ellie Large 480-461-0563 elarge@cox.net
Exec VP Marie Britton 480-827-8070 mbrit@cox.net
Treasurer Bob Unferth 602-371-1165 bobunf@cox.net 2255 E. State Ave.,
Phoenix, AZ 85020
Secretary Ellen Martin 480-820-1474 e13martin@hotmail.com
3-Year Director Vicki Erhart 480-730-3289 vickierhart@cox.net
2-Year Director Nancy Unferth 602-371-1165 nferth@aol.com
1-Year Director Phyllis Smith 623-694-8245 76desert@gmail.com
Archivist Vacant    
Certification Rep Marie Britton 480-827-8070 mbrit@cox.net
Membership Nancy Unferth 602-371-1165 nferth@aol.com
Advisor K.J. Schroeder 480-921-4055 roadrunnerkjs4@q.com


Meetings 

The chapter meets at Pueblo Grande Museum, at 7:00 pm, on the second Thursday of each month (except during June, July & August). Driving directions to PGM: Due to the construction of the light-rail system, west-bound cars can no longer turn left from Washington Street into the museum; instead traffic approaching from the east must make a u-turn at the light at 44th street. From the West Valley, use 44th Street or east-bound Washington Street.

Spring Schedule:

01/16/14    Charles Merbs
As Written in Our Bones: What Our Skeleton Can Tell Us About What We Did In Life

02/13/14   
   Nancy J. Serwint
City of Gold: Archaeological Excavations at Marion and Arsinoe, Cyprus
03/13/14    Evelyn Billo

Sears Point Rock Art and Beyond, Synopsis of the   2008-2012 Recording Project
04/10/14    Eric Klucas  
Identifying Nested Social Groups: The Pioneer Period in the Tucson Basin
05/08/14    George Cowgill
Teotihuacan: Researching Ancient City Life in Central Mexico






Membership Form - Click on the link below:


Phoenix Chapter Membership Form.pdf 


Chapter Projects

PGM STABILIZATION PROJECT- PHOENIX CHAPTER

Pueblo Grande is a Classic Period Hohokam site located in downtown Phoenix at Pueblo Grande Museum and Archaeological Park. This archaeological site has been designated a National Historic Landmark. For the past thirteen years the Arizona Archaeology Society, Phoenix Chapter volunteers along with the Southwest Archaeology Team have participated in doing stabilization, reconstruction, and general maintenance on the platform mound and adjacent room structures.

After the Hohokam abandoned this site, it fell into a state of self-stabilization where walls become protected by the material that eroded from above. Early excavations, especially in the 1930's, exposed many of these walls again. These adobe walls have been subjected to constant erosion from wind and rain as well as other agents of deterioration. Consequently, new adobe mud must be applied periodically to keep these structures from melting away. Stone faced walls require repointing to keep the stones from falling from the wall. Exposed room walls are protected by applying a thin layer of mud to the wall surface. Monitoring these architectural features for erosion damage is an on-going task.

A dedicated group of volunteers, known as the PGM Mudslingers meet one Saturday a month except in July and August. The Mudslingers work is coordinated by Jim Britton (member of AAS and SWAT) under the direction of Dr.Todd Bostwick (Phoenix City Archaeologist). All work is documented by detailed field notes and photos.

This partnership between the Mudslingers and the City Archaeologist is a great benefit to Pueblo Grande Museum and is very much appreciated by the Museum Director and the Parks and Recreation Department staff.

by Jim Britton

Project Activity Project Director
Mudslingers at Pueblo Grande 3rd Saturday of each month Contact Jim Britton to verify the time and day
480-827-8070
jabritton@cox.net








Local Museums

Museum Location Website
Pueblo Grande Museum and Archaeological Park 4619 E. Washington Street, Phoenix AZ 85034
(602) 495-0901
Pueblo Grande Museum
Huhugam Ki Museum
10005 E. Osborn Road, Scottsdale, Arizona 85256
(480) 850-8190
Huhugam Ki Museum
Arizona Museum of Natural History 53 N. Macdonald St.
Mesa, AZ 85201
(480) 664-2230
Arizona Museum of Natural History
Cave Creek Museum 6140 East Skyline Drive
Cave Creek, AZ 85331
(480) 488-2764
Cave Creek Museum



















Phoenix Chapter News

October Meeting:

The speaker for our Oct. 9th meeting will be Doug Newton, Site Steward & Agua Fria Chapter Member. Doug has been a site steward since 1992, and for the first fifteen years of that time was assigned to monitor the archaeological sites in the Eagletail Mountains, thus acquiring knowledge of the region. He also had the opportunity to work with Boma Johnson, the Bureau of Land Management archaeologist, as that area was in his region. Since that time he has become the regional site steward for the Tonopah  region and is also the regional site steward for the Central Arizona region, mainly Pinal County. He retired in 2002 and completed a master's degree in Plant Biology at ASU with his area of research providing a flora of the Eagletail mountain region. Doug will be leading a tour to see the Eagletail Mountain Petroglyphs on Sunday, Oct. 26. Be sure to sign up at the State Meeting on Oct. 25th!

September Meeting: Dr. Emily Early, Assoc. Curator, Mesa Grande Cultural Park (Arizona Museum of Natural History), gave a very interesting presentation on the research that she is conducting in the Tugen Hills in Kenya. She identifies mammal bones in order to identify shifts in mammalian species which correspond with periods of known global climate change in the Pliocene in order to better understand the environment in which hominids evolved.

Upcoming Speakers:

Oct. 9 - Doug Newton, Agua Fria Chapter, The Eagletail Mountain Petroglyphs

Nov. 13- Ric Alling, ASU Marston Theater, Archaeoastronomy in the Southwestern U. S.

Dec. 11 - Todd Bostwick, Interpreting the Nazca Lines: Enigmatic Images of the Peruvian Desert.

Upcoming State Meeting: The Phoenix Chapter hosts the 50th Anniversary of the Arizona Archaeological Society on Oct. 25th at the Pueblo Grande Museum. See pages 2 - 4 in the September Petroglyph. We need many volunteers to help us with the tasks required to make this a memorable occasion. Please contact Ellie large (elarge@cox.net or 461-0563), Marie Britton (480-390-3491), Nancy Unferth (602-371-1165), Ellen Martin (820-1474) or Phyllis Smith (623-694-8240) if you would like to help.  

September  Meeting:

Sept. 11. Dr. Emily Early, Assoc. Curator, Mesa Grande Cultural Park (Arizona Museum of Natural History), will kick off our Fall Schedule with a talk on Paleoecology and Human Evolution. She will discuss what it is like to work in Kenya, how they collect their data, the various ways they analyze it and what it all means in terms of our understanding of our past and has just returned to Arizona from a summer of fieldwork in Kenya. Her research focuses on mammalian shifts that correspond with periods of known global climate change in the Pliocene. Her primary research has been in Kenya, particularly the Tugen Hills. She is also involved in projects in Turkana and the Homa Peninsula.

The Tugen Hills, in the Baringo District of Kenya, has a succession of deposits from the period between 14 and 4 mya, which makes them an important location for the study of human and animal evolution. Excavations yielded a complete skeleton of a 1.5-million-year-old elephant in 1967, a new species of monkey in 1969 and fossil remains of hominids from 1 to 2 million years ago. In 2000, six million-year-old hominid fossils were discovered by Martin Pickford, the oldest ever discovered in Kenya, and the second oldest in the world. (From Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tugen_Hills.)

Emily has BAs in anthropology and history from the Barrett Honors College at ASU and an MA and PhD in Anthropology from Yale University. She was a Peter Buck Postdoctoral Fellow at the National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian from 2011-2013. Emily is a long-standing supporter of museum outreach, having been involved with the Arizona Museum of Natural History, the Arizona State University Anthropology Department Museum, the Deer Valley Rock Art Center, the Yale Peabody Museum, and the Smithsonian. She is also looking for volunteers to work at Mesa Grande Cultural Park during the week. She is excited to combine her love of research and dedication to the public’s knowledge of science while at Mesa Grande.

Upcoming Speakers:

Oct. 9 - Doug Newton, Agua Fria Chapter, The Eagletail Mountain Petroglyphs

Nov. 13- TBD

Dec. 11 - Todd Bostwick, Interpreting the Nazca Lines: Enigmatic Images of the Peruvian Desert.

Upcoming State Meeting:

The Phoenix Chapter will be  hosting the 50th Anniversary of the Arizona Archaeological Society on Oct. 25th at the Pueblo Grande Museum. We need many volunteers to help us with all of the tasks required to make this a memorable occasion. Please contact Ellie large (elarge@cox.net or 461-0563) or any of our board members if you would like to help.

 The Phoenix Chapter meets at 7 pm on the 2nd Thursday of each month in the Community Room at the Pueblo Grande Museum, 4619 E. Washington St., Phoenix. We take the speaker to dinner at 5:30 pm at the Ruby Tuesday Restaurant on 44th Street and Washington just northwest of the museum. If you are interested in having dinner with the speaker, please call or email Marie (480-827-8070 or mbrit@cox.net) so that she can reserve a large enough table.

--Ellie Large

May Chapter News:

May meeting: Our next meeting is on May 8th, when Dr. George Cowgill, ASU Professor Emeritus, will talk about “Teotihuacan: Researching Ancient City Life in Central Mexico.” Teotihuacan is one of the most spectacular ancient cities of the Americas, and ASU has played a major part in fieldwork at the site. Professor Cowgill will describe the city’s ruins and what they tell us about daily life, ritual, and rulership. The people of Teotihuacan achieved a sustainable way of life that flourished for centuries before its eventual collapse. Dr. Cowgill is an anthropological archaeologist with field experience in central Mexico and the Maya lowlands. Since 1964, he has concentrated on Teotihuacan. He joined ASU in 1990, bringing with him the Teotihuacan Research Facility. His research focuses on understanding ancient cities and states - how they were created, how they worked, and why they sometimes failed. Go to their website for more information: https://asuma.asu.edu/exhibits/city-life-experiencing-world-teotihuacan.

April Meeting: Dr.Eric Klucas from Statistical Research, Tucson, described the discovery of a very early (AD 550 - 650) Tortolita-phase Hohokam cemetery in the Northern Tucson Basin. Although no evidence of a large public plaza was found, as is common in later Hohokam sites, the area in which large numbers of cremation burials were found appeared to have been deliberately set aside for that use - there was no evidence of superimposition of any kind.  The area surrounding it, however, showed much evidence of the rebuilding of houses over previous house sites. Moreover, three of the cremation burials contained extremely large quantities of grave goods, especially of shell, a very rare occurrence at this stage. It was a very informative talk followed by a lively question-and-answer session.

Arizona Archaeologist #39: If you signed up for a copy of The Coyote Ruin, please pick up your copy at the May meeting. They will be available next to the sign-in table by the back door.

Upcoming Tour:
May 9:   Meet at 12:30 pm at the ASU Anthropology Museum for a guided tour of the exhibit “Teotihuacan City 

Life: Experiencing the World of Teotihuacan,” which closes May 12.

 

April Chapter News:
April Meeting: Our next meeting is on April 10th, when Eric Klucas from Statistical Research, Tucson, will present a talk on “Identifying Nested Social Groups: The Pioneer Period in the Tucson Basin.” This talk explores the kinds of social groups that may have composed the early village sites of the Northern Tucson Basin, including Pioneer period sites in both the northern and central Tucson Basin. From examination of residential and burial features, site structure and the use of space, an interpretation is offered on how these groups may have been integrated into an emerging, broader Hohokam society. In addition, the ways in which these various groups may have set the stage for the development of later expressions of Hohokam organization will be discussed. Eric Klucas is a Principal Investigator in the Tucson Office of Statistical Research Inc. For the past 15 years, his research has focused on the study of domestic organization and the use of space in Formative period villages in the American Southwest.

March Meeting: Evelyn Billo from the Northern Arizona Chapter and Rupestrian CyberServices, gave a very interesting talk on “An Archaeological Record of the Sears Point Petroglyph Complex," showing us close-up photographs of the rock art panels as well as aerial photographs of the sites taken from airplanes, hot-air balloons, and a drone fitted with a camera (which was available for us to examine). The talk was based on the 190-page final report and analysis on file with the Yuma Field Office of the Bureau of Land Management.

A big thank you to Nancy Unferth for the delicious cookies that she baked for the meeting and to Ellen Martin for the equally delicious Irish soda bread that she brought from Sprouts.  

Upcoming MeetingMay 8th, Teotihuacan: Researching Ancient City Life in Central Mexico by Dr. George Cowgill, ASU. 

Upcoming Tour: May 9th, Visit to the ASU Anthropology Museum’s exhibit:Teotihuacan City Life: Experiencing the World of Teotihuacan, which closes May 12.

March Chapter News
March Meeting: Our next meeting is on March 13th, when Evelyn Billo from the Northern Arizona Chapter and Rupestrian CyberServices will talk about the Sears Point Rock Art and Beyond, Synopsis of the 2008-2012 Recording Project. Utilized for centuries by many cultures, the National Register Sears Point Archaeological District (SPAD) is located along the rich riparian habitat of the Gila River. Currently managed by the Yuma District of the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), a large portion of the District is designated an Area of Critical Environmental Concern and is still utilized by several of the 15 Tribes that claim cultural affiliation there. Responding to a BLM request for comprehensive rock art recording, Rupestrian CyberServices (Evelyn Billo and Robert Mark) and Plateau Mountain Desert Research (Donald E. Weaver, Jr.) mapped approximately 2000 petroglyph panels and 100 features including rock piles, rock rings, artifact scatters, a rock shelter, several apparent natural and constructed hunting blinds, geoglyphs, and scattered rock alignments. They also mapped many historic features and an extensive network of prehistoric, historic, and animal trails. Recording and photographing SPAD required a three-year effort with the help of 50 volunteers, and some unusual techniques.

February Meeting: The speaker for our Feb. 13th meeting was Dr. Nancy Serwint, Assoc. Professor of Art History in the ASU Herberger Institute School of Art. Her topic was City of Gold: Archaeological Excavations at Ancient Marion and Arsinoe. With degrees in both Art History and Archaeology, she is the Assistant Director of Princeton University’s excavations on Cyprus, where she has worked for 26 years. She gave a fascinating talk about the history of Cyprus and its relationships with Greece, Phoenicia, and Egypt, and explained how the artifacts illuminate that past.  

Upcoming Meetings:

April 10:    Eric Klucas, Statistical Research, Identifying Nested Social Groups: The Pioneer Period in the Tucson Basin.

May 8:      George Cowgill, ASU, Teotihuacan: Researching Ancient City Life in Central Mexico.

Upcoming Hikes/Tours:

May 9: Visit to the ASU Anthropology Museum’s exhibit on Teotihuacan City Life: Experiencing the World of Teotihuacan, which closes May 12. Tour starts at 12:30 pm.  

Upcoming Class:

March 22 - The Phoenix Chapter is sponsoring a free 1-day Introduction to Arizona Archaeology for new or prospective members. The class will be held in the Pueblo Grande Museum Community Room from 9 am to 4:15 pm. Class members will need to bring their own lunches or plan to eat nearby.
 
Renewals: Memberships for 2013 expired on Dec. 31st. Members can renew at the March meeting or by sending a check along with a membership form to AAS, Phoenix Chapter, c/o Bob Unferth, Treasurer, 2255 E. State Avenue, Phoenix, AZ 85020. Membership forms are available at all meetings and are also available to download from the link below. Dues are $35 for individuals and $40 for families.

February 2014:

February Meeting: The speaker for our Feb. 13th meeting will be Dr. Nancy Serwint, Associate Professor of Art History in the ASU Herberger Institute School of Art. Her topic is City of Gold: Archaeological Excavations at Ancient Marion and Arsinoe. She is also the Assistant Director of Princeton University’s excavations on Cyprus, where she has worked for 26 years. She will share some of the stories behind the artifacts from these two ancient cities as well as some vignettes about her archaeological life.
January Meeting: On Jan. 16th Dr. Charles F. Merbs, Prof. Emeritus of Anthropology, explained What Our Skeleton Can Tell Us About What We Did In Life. He explained how forensic anthropologists can tell, from evidence left on our bones, how we used (or abused) our bodies and in some cases, even whether we were left-handed or right-handed.
Upcoming Meetings:

March 13  Evelyn Billo, Robert Mark and Donald E. Weaver, Jr. – Sears Point Rock Art and Beyond, Synopsis of the 2008-2012 Recording Project

April 10    Eric Klucas, Statistical Research, Identifying Nested Social Groups: The Pioneer Period in the Tucson Basin.

Recent and Upcoming Hikes/Tours:

Feb/March   San Tan Mountain Regional Park Petroglyph Hike with San Tan Chapter with Park Ranger Sarah Steele. The date will be announced at the February meeting and in our chapter newsletter.

April/May    Visit to the ASU Anthropology Museum’s exhibit on Teotihuacan City Life: Experiencing the World of Teotihuacan, which runs until May 16.

Upcoming Class:

March 22 - The Phoenix Chapter is sponsoring a free 1-day Introduction to Southwestern Archaeology for new or prospective members. The class will be held in the Pueblo Grande Museum Community Room from 9 am to 4:15 pm. Class members will need to bring their own lunches.

Renewals: Memberships for 2013 expired on Dec. 31st. Members can renew at the January meeting or by sending a check along with a membership form to AAS, Phoenix Chapter, c/o Bob Unferth, Treasurer, 2255 E. State Avenue, Phoenix, AZ 85020. Membership forms will be available at the January meeting and are available to download from the Phoenix Chapter web page at AzArchSoc.org. Dues are $35 for individuals and $40 for families.

-- Ellie Large

 

January 2014:
January Meeting: Note: Our January meeting date has been moved back one week, to Thursday, Jan. 16th, to allow members to attend the Biennial Southwest Conference in Las Vegas (Jan. 10-11). Our January speaker will be Dr. Charles F. Merbs, Prof. Emeritus of Anthropology, whose topic is As Written in Our Bones: What Our Skeleton Can Tell Us About What We Did In Life. A preeminent forensics scholar, Dr. Merbs specializes in the studies of the human skeleton, especially involving pathology and trauma. While he has worked more with ancient skeletons than modern, he has aided medical examiners in Wisconsin, Illinois, Arizona and Georgia on cases involving personal identification and homicide. Dr. Merbs received his Ph.D. in Anthropology from the Univ. of Wisconsin in 1969. He taught at the University of Chicago from 1964-1973 before moving to ASU to chair the Department of Anthropology, a position he held for six years. Retiring in 2004, he currently is Professor Emeritus at ASU. He has had numerous academic publications, has been published in TIME magazine and has written articles for The World Book Encyclopedia. He continues to participate in professional meetings, as well as doing research and publishing the results. He also continues to be active in community and professional service organizations.

December Meeting: Dr. Michael E. Smith, Prof. of Anthropology at ASU, gave us a great talk on Three Mysteries: My Search for Aztec Families and Communities. Unlike most Mesoamerican archaeologists, he has focused his research on the excavation of everyday houses and the study of daily life. He compared the results from the excavations of three Aztec sites near Cuernavaca, Mexico: an Aztec city (Yautepec), an Aztec town (Cuexcomate), and an Aztec village (Capilco). There was no evidence of human sacrifice or cannibalism, and the peasants appeared to be both better off and more well-connected than expected, as shown by the presence of trade goods and imagery. All who were present enjoyed both his talk and the potluck dinner that preceded it.

Elections: The slate of officers suggested by the board was approved unanimously at the December meeting. The officers for 2014 are: President, Ellie Large; Exec. VP, Marie Britton; Treasurer: Bob Unferth; Secretary, Ellen Martin; 1-Yr. Director, Phyllis Smith; 2-Yr. Director, Nancy Unferth; 3-Yr. Director, Vicki Erhart.

Recent and Upcoming Hikes/Tours:

Jan. 25 – We will have a guided tour of the rock art in the Box Canyon in South Mountain Park. Details and sign-up sheets will be available at the January meeting.

Upcoming Class:

March 22 - The Phoenix Chapter is sponsoring a free 1-day Introduction to Southwestern Archaeology for new or prospective members. The class will be held in the Pueblo Grande Museum Community Room from 9 am to 4:15 pm. Class members will need to bring their own lunches.

--Ellie Large

 

December 2013:

November Meeting: The speaker at our Nov. 14th meeting was Glennda Luhnow, from Archaeological Consulting Services, whose topic was Tracks Through Time - the Urban Archaeology of the Valley Metro Central Phoenix/East Valley Light Rail Transit Project. She explained how archaeologists knew which sites and canals would be impacted by the Light Rail Project and how the project proceeded. Between 2005 and 2008, the project investigated 29 archaeological sites, including habitations sites such as Pueblo Grande, La Plaza, and Dutch Canal Ruin, crossed numerous Hohokam and Historic era canal alignments, and found over 1,000 individual archaeological features. The artifacts found near Pueblo Grande are housed at the Pueblo Grande Museum, and the artifacts from La Plaza, on the ASU campus, are housed in the Tempe History Museum. Her talk was followed by a lively question-and-answer session.

December Meeting: Our December Holiday Potluck and Meeting will be held on Dec. 12th with the Potluck Dinner at 6 pm, and the talk to start around 7 pm. As usual, the Phoenix Chapter will provide barbecued meat, sauce, buns and beverages, while members are asked to bring their favorite side dish or dessert.

The presentation will be by Dr. Michael E. Smith on Three Mysteries: My Search for Aztec Families and Communities. Dr. Smith is a Professor of Anthropology at ASU and has directed fieldwork projects at numerous Aztec sites in central Mexico, pioneering the excavation of houses and the study of daily life. His excavations of three Aztec sites near Cuernavaca, Mexico, have revealed a surprising side of ancient Native American culture. He will be describing excavations at three sites: an Aztec city (Yautepec), an Aztec town (Cuexcomate), and an Aztec village (Capilco).

January Meeting: Note: Our January meeting date has been moved back one week, to Thursday, Jan. 16th, to accommodate members who want to attend the Southwest Conference in Las Vegas (Jan. 10-11). Our Jan. 16thspeaker will be Dr. Charles F. Merbs, Prof. Emeritus of Anthropology, ASU, whose topic is As Written in Our Bones: What Our Skeleton Can Tell Us About What We Did In Life.

Recent and Upcoming Hikes/Tours:

Nov. 9 -  Several members of the Phoenix Chapter joined the San Tan Chapter and the AAHS on a hike led by Dr. David Doyel to visit two sites on the Barry M. Goldwater Gunnery Range East, in the desert south of Gila Bend.

Jan. 25 – We will have a guided tour of the rock art in the Box Canyon in South Mountain Park. Details and sign-up sheets will be available at the December meeting.

Upcoming Class:

March 22 - The Phoenix Chapter is sponsoring a free 1-day Introduction to Southwestern Archaeology for new or prospective members. The class will be held in the Pueblo Grande Museum Community Room from 9 am to 4:15 pm. Class members will need to bring their own lunches.

--Ellie Large

 

November 2013:

November Meeting: Our Nov. 14th  talk is on the Urban Archaeology of the Valley Metro Central Phoenix/East Valley Light Rail Transit Project by Glennda Luhnow, M.A, R.P.A., from Archaeological Consulting Services, Ltd., Tempe. Between 2005 and 2008, Archaeological Consulting Services, Ltd. (ACS) served as the archaeological contractor for the construction phase of the Valley Metro Central Phoenix/East Valley Light Rail Transit project. The project investigated 29 archaeological sites, including habitations sites such as Pueblo Grande, La Plaza, and Dutch Canal Ruin, crossed numerous Hohokam and Historic era canal alignments, and found over 1,000 individual archaeological features. 

October Meeting: Our Oct. 10th meeting featured Dr. Todd Bostwick, who gave us a slideshow and talk on The Ancient and Modern Maya of Guatemala and Honduras. Todd took us along on his trip to the Mayan sites of Copan, Quirigua and Tikal where he had taken many photographs of the beautiful archaeological sites and the monuments within them as well as of the people and their beautiful homeland.

Glennda was the Senior Project Manager for ACS for the archaeology of the project, which included 3 years of monitoring, testing, and data recovery fieldwork. Her talk will focus on the results of the project in Phoenix, but will also provide an overview of what they found at the Hohokam habitation site of La Plaza, located on the ASU campus at the foot of Tempe Butte.

December Meeting: Our December meeting and potluck will be on Dec. 12th and will feature Dr. Michael Smith, who will talk about Three Mysteries: My Search for Aztec Families and Communities. Dr. Smith is a Professor of Anthropology at Arizona State University and has directed fieldwork projects at numerous Aztec sites in central Mexico, pioneering the excavation of houses and the study of daily life. His excavations of three Aztec sites near Cuernavaca, Mexico, have revealed a surprising side of ancient Native American culture. He will be describing excavations at three sites: an Aztec city (Yautepec), an Aztec town (Cuexcomate), and an Aztec village (Capilco). For more information go to http://calixtlahuaca.blogspot.com.

Upcoming Hikes/Tours:

Nov. 9: We will join the San Tan Chapter on a hike led by Dr. David Doyel to visit two sites on the Barry M. Goldwater Gunnery Range East, in the desert south of Gila Bend. For more information contact Marie Britton (480-827-8070 or mbrit@cox.net). 

Nov. 23: We will join the Agua Fria Chapter on a hike to see the Picacho Petroglyphs with t Steve Ross, Arizona State Land Manager. Details should be available by the Nov. 14th meeting. We are also working on several other hikes to take place in the spring.

--Ellie Large

October 2013:

October Meeting: Our Oct. 10th meeting will feature Dr. Todd Bostwick, who will talk about The Ancient and Modern Maya of Guatemala and Honduras. The Maya Culture of Central America is considered one of the most advanced of all the ancient civilizations on earth. They built impressive temples and palaces, created beautiful arts and crafts, had a sophisticated writing system, and developed complex calendars that continue to amaze us today. In this program, Dr. Bostwick will discuss his recent trip to Guatemala and Honduras where he visited with the current Maya residents, witnessed some of their ceremonies, and toured ancient Mayan archaeology sites, including the incredible World Heritage sites of Tikal and Copan. Dr. Bostwick retired in 2010 from 21 years as Phoenix City Archaeologist and is currently Senior Research Archaeologist for PaleoWest Archaeology and Director of Archaeology for the Verde Valley Archaeological Center in Camp Verde. He has authored and co-authored an impressive number of professional articles and books on Southwestern archaeology, archaeoastronomy, and history.

September Meeting: Our Sept. 12th meeting featured Scottsdale author Carolina Butler, who talked about her recently published book, Oral History of the Yavapai, a history of the Yavapai in their own words. She explained how she became involved with the fight against Orme Dam, with the Yavapai at Fort McDowell, and with the research that led to this book and also gave us a short introduction to the history of the Yavapai tribe. The Ice Cream Social which was held before the meeting started was enjoyed by all who attended.

Speakers for Fall 2013:

Nov. 14: Glennda Luhnow, ACS, The Metro Light Rail Project.

Dec. 12: Michael Smith, ASU, Three Mysteries: My Search for Aztec Families and Communities. http://calixtlahuaca.blogspot.com/

Upcoming Hikes/Tours:

Nov. 8    Tovrea Castle & grounds. Sign-up sheets will be available at the Oct. 10th meeting. The cost is $15 and payment needs to be collected so that we can pay to hold the tour.

Upcoming Conferences:

Oct. 16-19    Paleoamerican Odyssey: A Conference Focused on First Americans Archaeology. Go to the website for the schedule and to register at paleoamericanodyssey.com.

Oct. 25         Arizona Archaeological Council Fall Conference: Current Perspectives: Methodological, Technological, and Theoretical Advancements in Arizona Archaeology, Arizona Museum of Natural History, Mesa. Includes tour of Mesa Grande ruins on Friday morning. Pre-registration by Oct. 18 is $25. Go to www.arizonaarchaeologicalcouncil.org for the conference schedule.

Nov. 1-3       AAS State Meeting, Prescott. Registration & payment due by Oct 21; the registration form was in the September Petroglyph.

Jan. 10-11     14th Southwestern Symposium: Social Networks in the American Southwest. At the University of Las Vegas, Nevada. Go to anthro.unlv.edu for the schedule and to register.

April 23-27   Society for American Archaeology Annual Meeting, Austin, Texas. Go to saa.org for more information.

--Ellie Large

September 2013

Welcome back! We closed out the spring season with a tour of the Zelma Basha Salmeri Gallery of Western American and Native American Art in Chandler on June 14. Ten of us spent a couple of hours enjoying the outstanding collection of western bronze sculptures, Native American and western paintings, Native American baskets, pottery, fetishes, and jewelry. It was well worth the time. Afterwards we enjoyed lunch at a nearby Chandler restaurant. (See www.bashas.com/OurCommunity/BashasArtGallery.aspx for more information.)

September Meeting: Our Sept. 12th meeting will feature Scottsdale author Carolina Butler, who will talk about her book, Oral History of the Yavapai, a history of the Yavapai in their own words. She will explain how it came to be and how she became involved in it. She will also bring copies of her book for sale and signature. More details are available at www.oralhistoryoftheyavapai.com.

Ice Cream Social: We will also have ice cream and toppings to start off the meeting, so come as early as 6:45 pm to enjoy your fill and catch up on current happenings!

Speakers for Fall 2013:

Oct. 10: Todd Bostwick, Verde Valley Archaeology Center, The Ancient and Modern Maya of Guatemala and Honduras

Nov. 14: Glennda Luhnow, Archaeological Consulting Services, The Metro Light Rail Project

Dec. 12: Michael Smith, Arizona State University, Three Mysteries: My Search for Aztec Families and Communities. http://calixtlahuaca.blogspot.com/

--Ellie Large

 

© Arizona Archaeological Society
Powered by Wild Apricot Membership Software